Inclusive RSHE Toolkit icon

Inclusive RSHE Toolkit

Inclusive RSHE Toolkit

What is RSHE?

RSHE, which stands for Relationships, Sex, and Health Education, has been compulsory for schools since September 2020. Primary Schools are required to teach the relationship aspect of RSE, whilst secondary schools are mandated to provide students with relationships and sex education. Health education is now compulsory in schools, but the terms RSE and RHSE are often used interchangeably.

In primary schools, the emphasis is on establishing fundamental elements for fostering healthy and respectful relationships, concentrating on family and friendships across various contexts, including online interactions.

In secondary schools, the curriculum expands on these foundations, enhancing students’ comprehension of health with a heightened focus on potential risk areas such as drugs and alcohol. Furthermore, it introduces information about intimate relationships and sex, aiming to equip students with the knowledge necessary for maintaining positive and healthy sexual relationships.

The Diverse Educators’ Inclusive RSHE Toolkit

We are collating a growing bank of resources to help you to review and develop how inclusive the RSHE provision is in your school. Here are some questions to reflect on:

1. Representation:
Are diverse identities (gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, ability, etc.) adequately represented in the curriculum materials, resources, and examples used in RSHE lessons, and do they promote a positive understanding of different identities and relationships?

2. Cultural Sensitivity:
How culturally sensitive are the RSHE materials? Do they consider the cultural backgrounds and beliefs of all students and their families?

3. Accessibility:
Are RSHE materials accessible to students with different learning needs? Is the content presented in multiple formats to accommodate diverse abilities?

4. Language and Terminology:
Is the language used in RSHE materials inclusive and affirming? Are terms and concepts explained in a way that is easily understood and respectful of diverse perspectives?

5. Age appropriateness:
How do we ensure that all materials we are using are age appropriate and suitable for the individuals in the group?

6. CPD:
Have teachers received training on creating an inclusive and supportive RSHE environment? Are they equipped to handle questions and discussions around diverse identities and experiences?

7. Safe and Inclusive Spaces:
Do students feel that RSHE lessons create a safe and inclusive space for open discussions? Are there mechanisms in place to address any concerns related to inclusivity?

8. Feedback Mechanism and community engagement:
Is there a system in place for students, parents, and teachers to provide feedback on the RSHE curriculum in terms of inclusivity? How is this feedback used to make improvements?

9. Intersectionality:
Does the RSHE curriculum address the intersectionality of identities, recognising that individuals may experience multiple aspects of diversity simultaneously?
Regularly reviewing and updating your RSHE provision based on these reflections can contribute to a more inclusive and supportive learning environment for all students.

Articles

Curriculum for Wales

Relationships and Sexuality Education (RSE) Code

Read

England Guidance

Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education Statutory guidance for England

Read

PSHE Association

3 Steps to RSHE success

Read

Northern Ireland Guidance

Relationship and Sexuality Education (RSE) for Northern Ireland

Read

Scotland Guidance

Relationships, Sexual Health and Parenthood for Scotland

Read

Sex Education Forum

RSE, a guide for foster care

Read

Blogs

April Smith

Making time for RSE

Read

Brook

My RSE was too little too late. Let’s change this

Read

Ellen Parish

Young people’s suggestions for Relationships and Sexuality Education in Northern Ireland

Read

Ian Timbrell

The Sinister RSE Code

Read

Maisy Watkins (NSPCC)

The 4 Cs of online safety: online safety risk for children

Read

Sex Education Forum

Making RSE inclusive for all children

Read

Books

Brewer, Claire and Bradley, Kate

101 Inclusive and SEN Citizenship, PSHE and Religious Education Lessons: Fun Activities and Lesson Plans for Children Aged 3 – 11 (101 Inclusive and SEN Lessons)

View

Pugh, Victoria and McPhee, Sophie-Lauren

Developing Quality PSHE in Secondary Schools and Colleges

View

Rowland, Sián

Making PSHE Matter: A Practical Guide to Planning and Teaching Creative PSHE in Primary School

View

Podcasts

NSPCC

Supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in schools

Listen

Pride and Progress

Relationships and Sex Education, with Ian Timbrell

Listen

The SexEd Diaries

LGBT+ inclusive RSHE

Listen

Resources

ACET-UK

Free RSE Resources

View

Justin Hancock and Alice Hoyle

Do… A relationship and sex education resource

View

School of Sexuality Education

Resources for schools

View

Stonewall

LGBT – inclusive RSHE: Putting it into practice

View

Videos

BBC Northern Ireland

Different families

View

Kaz

Sex Education Should Start with Consent

View

Navigating Teen Life

Sex Education

View

Nicole McNichols

Students on Top: A Vision for 21st Century Sex Education

View

TEDed

Sex Education

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