Our Leading the Diverse Curriculum Training

Our Leading the Diverse Curriculum Training

Our Leading the Diverse Curriculum Training

Our Training Offer

We support teachers, curriculum/ subject/ phase leaders, and senior leaders responsible for curriculum design to diversify the curriculum in your school.

We deliver individual workshops and talks – virtually and face to face – but due to demand we are now launching a programme of curated sessions to support you on your journey to make your curriculum more inclusive and more representative.

This programme will support you in raising consciousness, developing confidence and building competence in how to diversify your curriculum design, delivery and resources.

Our training programme will include sessions and activities:
  • Exploring bias in theory and practice
  • Establishing language of diversity in the curriculum
  • Defining the scope of diversity in the curriculum
  • Addressing common misconceptions
  • Understanding theoretical frameworks on curriculum
  • Countering arguments against diversity in the curriculum
  • Identifying mechanisms for curriculum evaluation
  • Signposting practical support for schools evaluating the curriculum
  • Introducing common ‘lenses’ for review of the diverse curriculum
  • Highlighting common traps in curriculum and diversity
  • Highlighting the role of student voice in creating a diverse curriculum
  • Dealing with parental/community feedback
Our clients include:
  • Summit Learning Trust

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Our Inclusive Workplaces Training

Our Inclusive Workplaces Training

Our Inclusive Workplaces Training

Our Training Offer

We support schools and trusts in reflecting on how truly inclusive they are as workplaces.

We deliver individual workshops and talks – virtually and face to face – but due to demand we are now launching a programme of curated sessions to support you on your journey to make your school a more inclusive workplace for all of your employees.

This programme will support you in raising consciousness, developing confidence and building competence in how to review policies, practices and processes to ensure that inclusion is at the core of your employer’s promise to your staff.

Our training sessions include:
  • Becoming a culturally-intelligent school
  • Becoming a life-friendly school
  • Becoming a menopause aware school
  • Becoming an anti-racist school
  • Becoming a disability aware school
  • Becoming a trans-inclusive school
Our clients include:
  • OTSA
  • Summit Learning Trust

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Our Courageous Conversations Training

Our Courageous Conversations Training

Our Courageous Conversations Training

Our Training Offer

We support schools in empowering their staff to be empowered to have courageous conversations in the workplace.

What is a Courageous Conversation?
In courageous conversations, whether in the context of performance appraisal, mentoring, or coaching, individuals are encouraged to express their views openly and truthfully, rather than defensively or with the purpose of laying blame. Integral to courageous conversations is an openness to learn.

What is an example of a Courageous Conversation
Typical examples include handling conflict, confronting a colleague, expressing an unpopular idea on a team, asking for a favour, saying no to a request for a favour, asking for a raise, or trying to have a conversation with someone who is avoiding you. Research shows that many women find such “courageous conversations” challenging.

What to Expect
Expect to be challenged in a safe and supportive way as we navigate how to set up and hold the conversations that we avoid. We will unpack the themes of authenticity, vulnerability and courage, considering what this means for our leadership style.

What You Will Learn
We will raise our consciousness, increase our confidence and develop our competence in how we show up as leaders. We will develop deep listening skills, we will explore difficult topics, and we will practise the art of simultaneously caring and challenging others.

What You Will Gain
You will develop new skills. You will establish critical friends. You will be more confident in tackling those courageous conversations with your colleagues.

We can deliver face to face and virtually, for HR conferences, trust training events and individual teams.

Our training sessions include:
  • Creating the Container
  • Building Psychological Safety
  • Embracing Vulnerability
  • Balancing Care and Challenge
  • Handling Emotional Wake
Our clients include:
  • Dollar Academy
  • Elliot Learning Foundation
  • Hearts Academy Trust
  • Summit Learning Trust

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Our ECT Training

Our ECT Training

Our ECT Training

Our Training Offer

We support a number of ECF providers and teaching school hubs with their DEI provision and strategy to support their ECTs in Year 1 and 2 of their induction into the profession.

We organise conferences, hold virtual events, deliver talks and curate webinar series to explore key themes around diversity, equity and inclusion.

We facilitate core DEI training for whole training cohorts, of primary and secondary ECTs, for them, their mentors, and the team from the provider.

Our training sessions include:
  • Developing an understanding of key DEI concepts and language
  • Reflecting on our own identities and lived experience
  • Exploring our power, privilege and blind spots
  • Preparing for courageous conversations
  • Creating inclusive learning environments
  • Representing diverse role models in our curriculum
Our clients include:
  • Bright Futures Alliance for Learning
  • Chiltern Learning Trust
  • OTSA

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Courageous Conversations Toolkit

Courageous Conversations Toolkit

Courageous Conversations Toolkit

What is a Courageous Conversation?

In courageous conversations, whether in the context of performance appraisal, mentoring, or coaching, individuals are encouraged to express their views openly and truthfully, rather than defensively or with the purpose of laying blame. Integral to courageous conversations is an openness to learn.

What is an example of a Courageous Conversation?

Typical examples include handling conflict, confronting a colleague, expressing an unpopular idea on a team, asking for a favour, saying no to a request for a favour, asking for a raise, or trying to have a conversation with someone who is avoiding you. Research shows that many women find such “courageous conversations” challenging.

How do you frame a Courageous Conversation?

  • Set your intentions clearly.
  • Create a container.
  • Prepare facilitators & groups.
  • Set it up.
  • Open with vulnerability.
  • Have the discussion.
  • Come back together and close.
  • Support each other.

What does the research tell us about Courageous Conversations?

According to the work of Susan Scott there are The Seven Principles of Fierce Conversations:

  1. Master the courage to interrogate reality. Are your assumptions valid? Has anything changed? What is now required of you? Of others?
  2. Come out from behind yourself into the conversation and make it real. When the conversation is real, change can occur before the conversation is over.
  3. Be here, prepared to be nowhere else. Speak and listen as if this is the most important conversation you will ever have with this person.
  4. Tackle your toughest challenge today. Identify and then confront the real obstacles in your path. Confrontation should be a search for the truth. Healthy relationships include both confrontation and appreciation.
  5. Obey your instincts. During each conversation, listen for more than content. Listen for emotion and intent as well. Act on your instincts rather than passing them over for fear that you could be wrong or that you might offend.
  6. Take responsibility for your emotional wake. For a leader there is no trivial comment. The conversation is not about the relationship; the conversation is the relationship. Learning to deliver the message without the load allows you to speak with clarity, conviction, and compassion.
  7. Let silence do the heavy lifting. Talk with people, not at them. Memorable conversations include breathing space. Slow down the conversation so that insight can occur in the space between words.

The Diverse Educators’ Courageous Conversations Toolkit

We are collating a growing bank of resources to support you in how you lean into courageous conversations with colleagues, line managers, friends and family about DEI matters. We would encourage you to reflect on the following questions:

  • What does having a Courageous Conversation mean to you?
  • How psychologically safe do you feel in your organisation and how might this impact your ability to have Courageous Conversations?
  • How secure is your sense of belonging in your organisation, and how might this impact your ability to have Courageous Conversations?
  • How often do you listen to learn and understand, not to interject?
  • If you avoid having Courageous Conversations, how does this cause bigger problems for you?
  • What are the ideal conditions for holding a Courageous Conversation?

Articles

Better Up: What does it take to have courageous conversations at work?

Read

Elevate Network: Radical Candor: Part 2 — Breaking it Down

Read

Great Place to Work: Courageous Conversations at Work: A Guide To the Discussion You Are Scared Of

Read

Insight Business Works: Courageous Conversations: The Challenges for Women

Read

LearnLight: Leadership 101: How to Have Courageous Conversations at Work

Read

Lifehack: 7 Keys to Having a Courageous Conversation With Anyone

Read

MindTools: Radical Candor – The Truth Doesn’t Always Need to Hurt

Read

WorkPlacePlus: What is a Courageous Conversation?

Read

Blogs

Brene Brown: Let’s Rumble

View

Brene Brown: Clear is Kind. Unclear is Unkind

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Courageous Conversations

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Teach Better

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The Blog: Radical Reading

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The Fierce Blog

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Books

Bourgeois, Trudy. Equality: Courageous Conversations About Women, Men, and Race to Spark a Diversity and Inclusion Breakthrough

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Brown, Brene. Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead

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Conner, Yana. Ducksworth, Chantelle. Fields, Lisa. Courageous Conversations: The Tools You Need For the Conversations in the Culture

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Grenny, Joseph. Patterson, Kerry. McMillan, Ron. Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High

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Hines, William and Carolyn. What to Say and How to Say It: 72 Courageous Conversations for the Workplace

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Scott, Kim. Radical Candor: Fully Revised and Updated Edition: How to Get What You Want by Saying What You Mean

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Scott, Susan. Fierce Conversations: Achieving success in work and in life, one conversation at a time

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Scott, Susan. Fierce Leadership: A bold alternative to the worst 'best practices' of business today

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Singleton, Glen. Courageous Conversations About Race A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools and Beyond

View

Podcasts

Courageous Conversations About Our Schools

Listen

The Courageous Conversations Podcast

Listen

Elevate with Robert Glazer

Listen

Fierce Podcast Hub

Listen

The Radical Candor Podcast

Listen

Unbeatable Mind Podcast

Listen

Resources

Brene Brown

View

Fierce Inc

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Radical Candor

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The Courageous Conversation Compass

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The Ontario Leadership Framework: Engaging in Courageous Conversations

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Videos

Flowplayer: The Four Agreements of Courageous Conversations

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Glenn Singleton: Courageous Conversations about Race

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HumanNatureAtWork: Courageous Conversations At Work: What's the One Conversation...

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Lauren Mackler at Harvard: Difficult Conversations

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Luvvie Ajayi Jones: Get comfortable with being uncomfortable

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Personify Leadership: Courageous Conversations

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Microaggressions Toolkit

Microaggressions Toolkit

Microaggressions Toolkit

What are Microaggressions?

The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines microaggression as:
“A comment or action that subtly and often unconsciously or unintentionally expresses a prejudiced attitude toward a member of a marginalised group (such as a racial minority)”.

The American National Institutes for Health states:
“Microaggressions are everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults – whether intentional or unintentional – that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to individuals based solely upon their marginalised group membership. Microaggressions repeat or affirm stereotypes about a minority group, and they tend to minimize the existence of discrimination or bias, intentional or not”.

There are three types of microaggressions:

  • Microinsults (usually unconscious, and convey rudeness/insensitivity)
  • Microassaults (often conscious, and are deliberately and derogatory)
  • Microinvalidations (usually unconscious, and exclude the thoughts, feelings, or experiences of a minority group).

The Diverse Educators’ Microaggressions Toolkit

  • What is meant by the term microaggressions?
  • What are my preconceptions about microaggressions and who they affect?
  • What are the differences between types of microaggressions?
  • Why do we need to be aware of what microaggressions are and who they affect?
  • Why is it important for microaggressions to be called out and challenged by everyone, not just those directly affected?

How to Counter Microaggressions

Dealing with Microaggressions can be time consuming and tiring if they are continually encountered. Microaggressions by their very nature may not be intentionally perpetrated. Therefore, allowing them to go unchallenged may lead to unintended negative learning and contribute to many feeling unwelcomed. For example, deciding where a person lives or works based on their appearance.

Some things we can all commit to doing as allies for others:

  • Challenge the action or words - let the individual know how you feel or are impacted by their actions or words.
  • Record the occurrences - a pattern of behaviour can be established by tracking over a period of time. This becomes important if you need to take things further, later down the line.
  • Take it to management - let someone in authority know what is occurring or take it to your Trade Union if you are a member.

Articles

Gender stereotypes – primary schools urged to tackle issue

Read

Microaggressions

Read

Tackling racial harassment in universities

Read

When and How to Respond to Microaggressions

Read

Where are all the female headteachers?

Read

Women in educational leadership – what needs to change

Read

Blogs

Andrew Limbong - Microaggressions are a big deal: How to talk them out and when to walk away

View

Girlguiding - Microaggressions and how can we avoid them?

View

Mindful Equity - Not an angry Black girl

View

Mindful Equity - Rising above

View

Rebekah Geinapp – Nurturing Antiracist Kids

View

UMSL - Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Blog

View

Books

Andrews, Kehinde. The New Age of Empire: How Racism and Colonialism Still Rule the World

View

Cousins, Susan and Diamond, Barry. Making Sense of Microaggressions

View

Eddo-Lodge, Reni. Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race

View

Gibson, Joseph et al. Teaching With Trauma in Mind

View

Kara, Bennie. A Little Guide for Teachers: Diversity in Schools

View

Kendi, Ibram. How To Be an Antiracist

View

Olusoga, David. Black and British: A short, essential history

View

Reid, Nova. Good Ally

View

Sue, Derald and Spanierman, Lisa. Microaggressions in Everyday Life

View

Wilson, Hannah and Kara, Bennie. Diverse Educators

View

Podcasts

Cornell University / Inclusive Excellence - Let’s Talk Microaggressions

Listen

Cultural Humility Podcast - Racial Microaggressions and Political Correctness

Listen

Every Woman - Microaggressions: tackling unconscious bias in an open working environment

Listen

Life Kit - Microaggressions are a big deal: How to talk them out and when to walk away

Listen

NPR (Non Profit Radio) - Microaggressions are a big deal

Listen

Resources

Commission on Race and Ethinic Disparities

View

Diversity in the Classroom, UCLA Diversity & Faculty Development, 2014

View

Equality Human Rights

View

Everyday Sexism

View

Microaggressions, Bristol University

View

Microaggressions Explained

View

Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life

View

Students Of Colour Share Their Experiences Of Oxford University

View

Tackling racial harassment: Universities challenged

View

Women in the Workplace 2021

View

Videos

Badlands - All the Little Things

View

Chimanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED talk: The danger of a single story

View

Laura Bates’ TED talk Everyday sexism

View

Learn to Spot — and Stop — Racial Microaggressions in Schools

View

Same Difference - How microaggressions are like mosquito bites

View

Tiffany Alvoid’s TEDx Talk: Eliminating Microaggressions: The Next Level of Inclusion

View

Derald Wing Sue Lecture: Microaggressions in Academia | The New School

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Our Middle Leaders' Training

Our Middle Leaders' Training

Our Middle Leaders' Training

Our Training Offer

We support middle leaders in primary and secondary, in state and independent, in the UK and internationally in developing their leadership around DEI through their roles and their teams.

We can deliver face to face and virtually, for leadership development days, meetings and twilights.

We raise consciousness, develop confidence and build competence in DEI being everyone’s responsibility, no matter what the role and remit we hold.

Our training sessions include:
  • Developing an understanding of key DEI concepts and language
  • Reflecting on our own identities and lived experience
  • Exploring our individual and collective power, privilege and blind spots
  • Translating our DEI commitment through curriculum and pastoral intent
  • Understanding how to support a diverse team
  • Developing inclusive leadership behaviours
  • Holding courageous conversations
  • Building DEI into the action plan for the team/ department/ subject
Our clients include:
  • AET
  • Christchurch Primary School
  • Haringey Learning Partnership
  • Highgate School
  • Hillbrook Primary School
  • NEU
  • Summit Learning Trust
  • Villiers School

Training with Hannah is always a pleasure. She is really good at giving you the information and allowing you to make your own observations. The training on diversity was incredibly informative and has given me some clear ways of how to move forward within my setting.

Jodie O'Neill, Phase Leader, Christchurch Primary School

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Our Student Sessions

Our Student Sessions

Our Student Sessions

Our Training Offer

We support schools and colleges (primary and secondary, in state and independent, in the UK and internationally) in creating space to hold conversations about DEI with their students.

We can deliver face to face and virtually, for PSHE lessons, assemblies and drop down days.

We raise consciousness, develop confidence and build competence in DEI being everyone’s responsibility, in all stakeholder groups.

Our training sessions include:
  • Exploring our own identity and belief systems
  • Understanding levels of belonging
  • Developing inclusive behaviour
  • Becoming upstanders, not bystanders
  • Finding our voices to speak out
  • Having courageous conversations
Our clients include:
  • Christ’s Hospital School
  • Dr Challoner’s Girls’ School
  • Langley Girls’ School
  • Latymer Upper School
  • Westonbirt School
  • West Buckland School

I have had pretty much universal positive feedback from the students (which is rare for a lecture that all students have to attend!) and I found your advice about enormously talented girls who “deselect themselves” so very useful (and sadly very resonant!)

Andy Bird, Assistant Headteacher, Dr Challoner's Girls' School

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Still I Rise

Still I Rise logo

Still I Rise

Still I Rise Diversity Storytelling was founded in 2019 to read books together and recommend our favourite titles from all over the world.

Our mission is to create trusted spaces where we can celebrate all people to encourage tolerance, acceptance and move with open hearts and minds to create a more loving world.

We offer story sessions, workshops and training for adults, children and young people to learn through stories that offer representation and explore themes including Emotional Well-Being, Celebrating Differences, Empathy & Changing Country ,Love Is Love, Stories in Sign, Neuro Diversity, Eco Warriors, Black Lives Matter and Kind Words, Inclusive Language and more!

Contact Still I Rise

Visit Website

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Exeter Consortium Schools' Alliance

Exeter Consortium Alliance logo

Exeter Consortium Schools' Alliance

Exeter Consortium Schools’ Alliance is a growing group of schools based in Exeter and the surrounding areas, striving to improve the quality of learning for our pupils. ​Working in partnership, we train the next generation of teachers and provide a comprehensive programme of professional development aimed at improving the quality of teaching and learning. ​We provide challenge and support to each other to improve our schools and organise supply teachers and teaching assistants through Exeter Supply Partnership. Within all these areas we are committed to ensuring our schools and training programmes are safe and inclusive for all.

Please see our website for course we run. We have run courses on Inclusion for example. What we want to do is develop our school CPD further to address other areas of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. We are exploring working with organisations such as yours to develop further School CPD in this area. We have also set up a working group with schools and trainees to see how we can support people to enter the profession if they are from minority groups and also to support them once training/teaching. For the question below, we would like to be offering courses which address more of these. We are Committed to equality for all.

Contact Exeter Consortium Schools' Alliance

Visit Website

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