Transgender Rights' Toolkit

Transgender Rights' Toolkit

Transgender Rights' Toolkit

What Does Transgender Mean?

A transgender person is an individual whose assigned gender at birth does not match their gender identity. Transgender women, for example, are women who were assigned the gender of ‘male’ at birth but do not identify with this assigned gender, identifying instead as women. A person can be transgender within the gender binary (transgender women and men) or transgender outside of it, using terms such as nonbinary or genderqueer- among other terms- to describe their gender identity. Effective allyship can ensure that transgender individuals’ identities are recognised, respected and protected.

Transgender allyship (on personal and organisational levels) includes:
  • Acknowledging and respecting people’s chosen names and/or pronouns
  • Supporting and safeguarding transgender individuals who are at risk of discrimination and prejudice
  • Creating trans-inclusive spaces e.g.: gender-neutral bathrooms
  • Using gender-neutral language for groups and for individuals whose gender is not known
  • Creating workplaces which support trans needs (e.g.: non-gendered dress codes, paid leave for employees undergoing transitional therapies)
  • Advocating for and defending the rights of transgender peers when challenged

The Diverse Educators’ Transgender Rights Toolkit

We are collating a growing bank of resources to support you in how you show up, how you stand up and how you speak out, on matters pertaining to transgender rights and welfare.

Blogs

Alok Menon

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GenderGP

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Noah Adams

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Our Transitional Life

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Books

Dawson, Juno. The Gender Games: The Problem With Men and Women, From Someone Who Has Been Both

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Faye, Shon. The Transgender Issue: An Argument for Justice

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Fisher, Owl & Fox. Trans Survival Workbook

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Iantaffi, Alex & Barker, Meg-John. Life Isn't Binary: On Being Both, Beyond, and in-Between

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Lester, CN. Trans Like Me – Conversations for All of Us

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Stryker, Susan. Transgender History: The Roots of Today’s Revolution

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Young, Eris. They/Them/Their: A Guide to Nonbinary and Genderqueer Identities

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Podcasts

Gender Reveal

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/Queer – a global history of Gender & Sexuality

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What the Trans!?

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Resources

Amnesty International – Gender identity for beginners: a guide to being a great trans ally

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A Brief History of Singular ‘They’

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GLAAD – Tips for Allies for Transgender People

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Harvard Business Review – Creating a Trans-Inclusive Workplace

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Human Rights Campaign – Understanding the Transgender Community

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Making Schools Trans-Friendly

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Videos

Fox Fisher – I AM THEY – A Non-Binary Transgender Documentary

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Jackson Bird – How to talk (and listen) to transgender people

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Jamie Raines

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Samy Nour Younes – A short history of trans people’s long fight for equality

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LGBT+ Inclusion Toolkit

LGBT+ Inclusion Toolkit

LGBT+ Inclusion Toolkit

What is LGBTQ+ Inclusion?

In order to understand how to be LGBTQ+ inclusive we first need to look at these letters stand for:

  • Lesbian
  • Gay
  • Bisexual
  • Transgender
  • Queer/Questioning
  • The plus encompasses the vast spectrum of sexuality and gender identity including Intersex, Asexual, Non-binary and Pansexual.

Since the 1990’s there has been significant progress in LGBTQ+ rights within the UK; from same sex marriage being made legal, to introducing the world’s first transgender action plan in 2011, to the inclusion of LGBTQ+ relationships in compulsory Relationship and Sex Education, however there is still much work to do. A recent government survey found that two thirds of LGBTQ+ couples avoid holding hands in public. This should be one of the simplest expressions of affection not something that is feared. It is important that we are creating an inclusive educational environment where students feel safe and represented as this can only have a positive impact on all students and staff.

The key findings from the 2017 Stonewall School Report are staggering and highlight why more needs to be done to be LGBTQ+ inclusive:

  • Nearly half of LGBT pupils (45 per cent) – including 64 per cent of trans pupils – are bullied for being LGBT in Britain’s schools. This is down from 55 per cent of lesbian, gay and bi pupils who experienced bullying because of their sexual orientation in 2012 and 65 per cent in 2007
  • Half of LGBT pupils hear homophobic slurs ‘frequently’ or ‘often’ at school, down from seven in 10 in 2012
  • Seven in 10 LGBT pupils report that their school says that homophobic and biphobic bullying is wrong, up from half in 2012 and a quarter in 2007. However, just two in five LGBT pupils report that their schools say that transphobic bullying is wrong
  • Just one in five LGBT pupils have been taught about safe sex in relation to same-sex relationships
  • More than four in five trans young people have self-harmed, as have three in five lesbian, gay and bi young people who aren’t trans
  • More than two in five trans young people have attempted to take their own life, and one in five lesbian, gay and bi students who aren’t trans have done the same

It has been proven that providing an LGBTQ+ inclusive education reduces incidents of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying as well as improving the mental wellbeing of LGBTQ+ youths. Ensuring that education is LGBTQ+ inclusive is imperative as attitudes learnt at school go with that young person into the world, the workplace and the wider community. Everyone (LGBTQ+ or not) benefits from a more inclusive education.

The Diverse Educators’ LGBTQ+ Inclusion Toolkit

We are collating a growing bank of resources to support you to be able to stand up, speak up and celebrate members of the LGBTQ+ community in your school.

You may want to consider reflecting on the following questions:

  • How can we avoid LGBTQ+ discrimination in our schools?
  • How can I encourage all school staff to understand the benefits of LGBTQ+ inclusion?
  • How do I challenge LGBTQ+ discrimination-based language and incidents?
  • How can we create an LGBTQ+ inclusive culture and ethos in our schools?

What does good LGBTQ+ inclusion look like?

To summarise
  • Bullying and use of derogatory language is consistently challenged
  • Gender neutral language is used across the school and in policies
  • Stereotypes are challenged – in the curriculum, in policies and in conversations
  • An inclusive curriculum – not just PSHE days
  • Diverse LGBTQ+ role models are visible
  • Staff need to have the training and the confidence to know how to support LGBTQ+ young people
  • Also, don’t underestimate visibility of LGBTQ+ members of staff and the impact of seeing them treated well. If students can see their teachers thriving then they are more likely to see how they can thrive too.

If, as educators, we can do this, then we are not only setting up young people for success, but society too.

Articles

Diversity Role Models

Pathways to LGBT+ Inclusion: Report (2020)

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Frontiers in Sociology

A Critical Analysis of LGBTQ+ Inclusion Policy in Schools (2021)

Read

Guardian

‘I had two separate lives’: LGBT teachers learn to speak up and get promotion (2020)

Read

I News

New regulations for teaching relationships and sex education in English (2020)

Read

The Scotsman

Scotland has become the first country in the world to embed lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender inclusive education across the school (2021)

Read

Stonewall

How LGBT inclusive education can change lives (2021)

Read

Blogs

Audit your curriculum for gender and LGBTQ+ inclusivity

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Brook Blog - How to make sure your RSE is LGBT+ inclusive

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Celebrating diversity and promoting inclusion – the ‘golden threads’ of effective practice

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Inclusive Education

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LGBT+ inclusion in schools

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The experiences of teachers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ+)

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Books

Dr Barnes, Elly and Dr Carlile, Anna. How to Transform Your School into an LGBT+ Friendly Place: A Practical Guide for Nursery, Primary and Secondary Teachers

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Dellenty, Shaun. Celebrating difference – a whole school approach to LGBT+ inclusion

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Kara, Bennie. Diversity in Schools

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Moffatt, Andrew. No Outsiders: Everyone Different, Everyone Welcome: Preparing Children for Life in Modern Britain

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Tomlinson-Gray, Daniel. Big Gay Adventures in Education: Supporting LGBT+ Visibility and Inclusion in Schools

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Uglow, Tea. Loud and Proud: LGBTQ+ Speeches that Empower and Inspire

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Podcasts

Being LGBTQ

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Ouch! 'I didn’t even know what bisexual was'

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SCHOOL’S OUT: time for LGBT-inclusive education

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The Story of Section 28

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Why Do We Ostracize Some Pupils?

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Why we need LGBT+ Inclusive Schools

Listen

Resources

Barnado’s Secondary Schools Resource Pack

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Just Like Us, Anti Bullying Week resources

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NEU Advice for LGBT Inclusion in schools

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Olly Alexander ‘Growing up gay’

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Scottish platform for learning

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Shh No talking - LGBT-inclusive Sex and Relationships Education in the UK

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Stonewall – An introduction to supporting LGBT children and young people

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Stonewall – Setting up a student voice group

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The Proud Trust

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Videos

Camelia Bui. Inclusive Language

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Grace James. Ignorance isn’t bliss - Why we need LGBTQ Education

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Kat Clark. Your words have the power to end suffering of LGBTQ youth

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Morgana Bailey. The danger of hiding who you are

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Can you be person of faith and LGBT?

View

Day Inclusive Practice Seminar on LGBT+ Inclusive Education

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Is My Child Too Young To Learn About Being Gay?

View

LGBTQ | How You See Me

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The way we think about biological sex is wrong

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Young Citizens

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Young Citizens

Young Citizens is an education charity working in primary and secondary schools to help educate, inspire and equip the active citizens of tomorrow. In our thirty-year history, we have mobilised more than 300,000 young people to take social action and reached over 1 million young people with our citizenship programmes and resources.

Young Citizens wants all young people to leave education understanding how society works – from politics to the law, the economy, the environment and human rights – in the UK and globally. We also want them to have the skills to navigate our complex society – able to think critically, listen to other viewpoints, and work together to create positive change. That is why we provide high-quality, specialised teaching and learning resources.

We have a library of over 100 lessons, assemblies, and tools that develop pupils’ spiritual, moral, social, and cultural (SMSC) learning, including their understanding of fundamental British values.

Since 1989, our work has touched the lives of millions of young people, supported by hundreds of thousands of teachers in tens of thousands of schools. Each year, thousands of volunteers help ensure that we consistently punch above our weight in our reach and impact.

We’re delighted that we were shortlisted for the prestigious Charity Times’ Charity of the Year Award in 2019 and in 2020 were shortlisted for the Teach Primary Awards.

  • 8,800 schools interventions were made by us in the past year. This ranges from signing up to one of our programmes, to using our topical teaching resources in their classes.
  • 370,000 children and young people benefited from our work in the last year. Either through direct involvement in our programmes, or because we supported their school to improve its citizenship education.
  • 2,000 volunteers – including barristers, solicitors, magistrates and judges – supported us in the past year.
  • 80% of secondary schools have used our programmes or teaching materials
  • 300,000 secondary school children have taken part in our social action programmes since 2008
  • 15,420 primary teachers have been trained by our team over the past decade

Contact Young Citizens

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Worth-it Positive Education CIC

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Worth-it Positive Education CIC

Worth-it was founded with the aim to apply evidence-based approaches of positive psychology and coaching psychology to create real change and prevent mental health problems for children and young people. This developed into our innovative approach to prevention, through improving wellbeing and developing positive mental health. We work with schools and organisations to increase capacity to provide early intervention and prevention. We specialise in supporting schools apply positive education.

Contact Worth-it Positive Education CIC

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HOPE not hate

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HOPE not hate

We work with schools to train teachers and with students to challenge prejudice. The anti-racism work we deliver in schools stems from the Education Unit having grown out of a community organising approach. Our aim is not just to educate students on racism, but also to be a catalyst towards positive behavioural change in schools across the country, which can act as a springboard towards a more inclusive society.

Contact HOPE not hate

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Yes She Can

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Yes She Can

We Inspire, Empower and Engage. We inspire our community to break career glass ceiling. We showcase inspirational women and provide real life role models. We upskill, coach and mentor people to help them be the best that they can be in their career. We engage with great businesses and educational establishments to support them on their Diversity journey. We deliver workshops, training and strategy consultation to help drive change.

Contact Yes She Can

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The Ogden Trust

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The Ogden Trust

The Ogden Trust aims to increase the uptake of physics post-16 by supporting physics education and engagement for all young people (4-18), particularly those in under-represented groups. The Trust supports schools, teachers, projects and programmes that are committed to enhancing physics teaching and learning.

Through school-led partnerships the Trust helps to build and sustain supportive, collaborative teaching communities that can bring about improvement in physics education, engagement and learning environments. The Trust offers support for teachers of physics through the provision of professional development, subject knowledge, skills and resources.

We work with universities, employers and community groups to help widen access to physics enrichment and to encourage more people to understand the career pathways that can be opened up through physics.

Our primary science curriculum resources on our website have been written by primary experts and physics specialists and are aimed at supporting the delivery of hands-on science in the classroom. Many of our secondary resources are provided by partners and associates of the Trust and we are pleased to signpost you to these excellent teaching and learning aids. There are Ogden resources that will be useful in secondary, particularly KS3.
In addition, we have a series of ‘How to’ guides from our partnership schools which offer first-hand advice on running enrichment activities, creating effective partnerships for science and raising the profile of physics within your school.

Our ‘Phizzi professional’ series gives an insight into just some of the many and varied careers available to aspiring young physicists. These resources can be used by primary and secondary practitioners.

We regularly run news stories and celebrate histories, i.e. Black History month

We have 6 research cards featuring inspirational black physicists for you to download

We will be celebrating LGBT+ History in February with resources

We also support girls into physics

Contact The Ogden Trust

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Teach First Multi-Faith Network

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Teach First Multi-Faith Network

We’re a group of teachers who aim to support, develop and inspire people of all faiths in the Teach First community. We have grown a lot since last June and have been holding events where people can get to know each other, learn more about teaching as a person of faith, and be reminded of why they started teaching.

We appreciate that teachers are busy, and that people experiencing discrimination can feel isolated. That is what we aim to challenge, by showing teachers that they are not alone. We connect teachers from a range of beliefs and offer a helping hand as they live out their faith.

We aim to meet every term, and because we have members from across the country, we do this online. We have events where we aim to develop our members as teachers, to help us live our faith through our work. We also have events where we reflect on why we teach, to help us to go to work with enthusiasm and passion.

If you’d like to get involved, we have newsletters which come out every term, and a number of micro-networks for personal support. Sign up and we’ll be in touch.

Contact Teach First Multi-Faith Network

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Schools of Sanctuary

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Schools of Sanctuary

Our vision at City of Sanctuary UK is that every community will proudly offer sanctuary to people forced to flee violence and persecution. To get there, we support a vibrant network, from community groups to councils, schools to libraries, all working to provide welcome to people seeking sanctuary. Schools of Sanctuary works with a growing network of more than 330 primary and secondary schools, all committed to providing support to the thousands of young people seeking sanctuary in the UK, whilst creating a culture of welcome and inclusion for all refugees and people seeking asylum.

To be recognised as a School of Sanctuary, schools must demonstrate that the whole school community has learnt about migration issues, embedded policies and practices of welcome and inclusion, and shared their learning and efforts with the wider community and Schools of Sanctuary network. In doing so, Schools of Sanctuary celebrates schools that proactively and effectively meet the needs of students from sanctuary-seeking backgrounds and/or take steps to challenge misinformation and inaccurate rhetoric around migration and promote social cohesion.

To support schools in their efforts, the Schools of Sanctuary team at City of Sanctuary UK organise regular events, signpost resources and advice, connect schools to local groups or organisations with whom they can partner and share case studies of best practice, all available on the website and outlined in the termly Schools of Sanctuary newsletter.

Contact Schools of Sanctuary

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The Rainbow Flag Award

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The Rainbow Flag Award

The Rainbow Flag Award is a national quality assurance framework for primary schools, secondary schools, SEND schools and colleges. The award focuses on positive LGBT+, (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, plus other related identities), inclusion and visibility.

The Rainbow Flag Award encourages a whole organisation approach to LGBT+ inclusion, as well as developing strategies to effectively challenge and combat LGBTphobic bullying.

Committing your school or college to the Rainbow Flag Award is a commitment to improve the lives of all the young people that you work with, as well as the LGBT+ young people in your care, those from LGBT+ families, and LGBT+ staff members.

SUPPORTING LOCAL
The Rainbow Flag Award is a national framework, that utilises only local LGBT+ youth organisations as delivery partners. This is a core guiding value of the award, which means that the training and services that are provided are relevant to, have understanding of, local communities and their needs. It also means that information shared through training and other communications, is current and fresh, representing the actual everyday experiences of LGBT+ young people in the local area.

Any monies generated by this scheme then help support, often underfunded, LGBT+ youth provision locally.

Contact The Rainbow Flag Award

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