Aspiring Heads Leadership Summit Conference 2021

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Written by Javay Welter

NPQ, MSc, Outstanding MFL teacher, public speaker, mentor and linguist.

On the 16th of October, I witnessed greatness. The Aspiring Heads Leadership Summit was phenomenal. Nadine and Ethan Bernard hosted a truly remarkable conference. Above all, this was the first leadership conference I had witnessed led by a current existing Black Headteacher, Nadine Bernard. Well done Nadine for your initiative, creating this platform and elevating future leaders. This was a pioneering conference, very timely and extremely forward-thinking.

The wide array of speakers in different fields provided a variety of perspectives and insights. Topics ranged from mentoring, strategic leadership to financial literacy. The speakers were all leaders and thought leaders in their respective fields. They shared their journey, resilience and barriers they had to overcome. The optional workshops were uplifting, insightful and edifying. I left feeling empowered, inspired and acquired so much wisdom. 

The first keynote speaker Bose Onaboye, who is a business strategist and leader, spoke about finding your leadership style and being highly reflective. Leadership development is a process. She encapsulated that leadership is a journey and not a destination. Leaders are readers. Therefore, one must strive to keep developing oneself and undertake CPDs. I fully agree that leading is a journey, not just a title. We must strive for excellence.

Another charismatic speaker Karl Pupé, an educator and author, highlighted that we must step out of our comfort zone to grow. Leadership is not easy and we must embrace change to grow. We must embrace more black leaders in all walks of life and value their unique and valuable skill sets and contributions. He mentioned that his various previous jobs have helped to strengthen his behaviour management, for example, negotiation, conflict resolution and dealing with challenging behaviour. His book Action Hero Teacher: Classroom Management Made Simple is an exemplary book on behaviour management. A must-read for new teachers.

Diana Osagie, a former black Headteacher and CEO of Courageous Leadership focused on being a human first and a leader second. Well-being is key to longevity. If you do not have health, you cannot lead. Sayce Holmes Lewis, Founder and CEO of Mentivity advocated that we need more servant leaders rather than being ego-centric ones to promote positive change. We need to lead from the back like Nelson Mandela. Sayce passionately highlighted that positive black male role models are crucial and that Devon Hanson, a former black Headteacher acted as an inspiration. Lavinya Stennett, founder and CEO of the Black Curriculum pointed out that Black History should be incorporated in the national curriculum and that representation is vital to success.

The second keynote speaker, Dr Leroy Logan MBE who is a former Metropolitan Police superintendent. He was also the chair of the National Black Police Association and discussed fear. He eloquently commented that his father feared his career choice. His father suffered police brutality. However, he had seen black role models and police officers in Jamaica which inspired him and it was his calling. Leroy emphasised that he entered the police profession to make a positive contribution and to help change the Met. His book ‘Closing Ranks’ shares his incredible journey from humble beginnings to becoming one the first black police superintendent in the UK. Leroy faced many adversities, barriers and did not give up. Importantly, he had a dream just like Dr Martin Luther King Jr. 

In conclusion, representation matters. Young pupils deserve a diverse education, inspiration and representation. Fundamentally, it is pivotal that they see leaders from diverse backgrounds to prepare them for the world of work. I believe that it would be beneficial to have more black and global majority leaders like Nadine Bernard leading conferences to elevate future generations and make a difference. Nadine has started a legacy. The next step is a follow-up conference.

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Refugee Cafe’s first training programme

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Written by Rose Bewick

Rose is the training coordinator at Refugee Cafe. She has previously worked for the British Red Cross on the Syrian Resettlement Program, and is soon to complete a masters in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration from the University of London.

Our mission at Refugee Cafe is to use the power of food to support local refugees and migrants into employment. So, we are extremely excited to be launching our very first training program, aimed at empowering refugees and migrants with a background in hospitality to find work in this industry.

Refugees and vulnerable migrants are disproportionately represented in the UK’s unemployment figures. They often face multiple barriers to accessing work, including limited English language skills and a  lack of UK work experience. At a time when food businesses are crying out for staff, this is the perfect moment to start bridging some of the gaps which keep refugees and migrants excluded from mainstream employment in this sector. By equipping them with the skills and knowledge they need to find work in the UK’s culinary industry, this course aims to help refugees and vulnerable migrants get back on their feet, regain their independence and work towards building a future for themselves and their families in the UK, by accessing mainstream employment.

Through a combination of theoretical classes and practical placements, this course will address some of the most significant barriers that refugees and migrants face when it comes to finding work in the food and hospitality industry. Classes will cover basic food hygiene and Covid measures, training in understanding budgeting and stock management, teamwork and communication skills, and more. The course will incorporate peer support coaching and communications workshops, and trainees will have the opportunity to learn from and connect with other refugees who have already found work in this industry. Trainees will also be supported to write CVs and apply for jobs, as well as learning what it takes to run a food business in the UK. The course is an opportunity for refugees to gain foundational knowledge of the UK food industry, UK work experience, Level 2 Food Safety and Hygiene qualification and professional references. They will also receive one to one help to work towards their long-term employment goals.

With a background in hospitality management, a love of great food, and a big belief in the power of the hospitality sector as a force for empowerment and community cohesion, I am so excited to work with refugees and migrants who care about hospitality and have a passion for food.

This is an eight-week, part time course, based in Lewisham. Classes will run on Monday and Tuesday mornings, with four 3-hour placements over the duration of the course. Our first course will run in November (exact dates to be confirmed), but we accept rolling applications.

If you, or anyone you know, is interested in becoming a trainee, please do get in touch to apply or ask questions. You can contact me (Rose) at rose@refugeecafe.org.uk or 07306413599

 

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#DiverseEd’s Top 10 Blogs of 2020-21

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Written by DiverseEd

Diverse Educators started as a grassroots network in 2018 to create a space for a coherent and cohesive conversation about DEI. We have evolved into a training provider and event organiser for all things DEI.

We love to amplify the voices, share the journeys, and celebrate the stories of our community.  Our blogs vary from sharing lived experience, to reflecting on classroom practice and curriculum design, to evaluating the impact of policy changes. We published 150 blogs from our network last academic year. You can meet our bloggers here and you can review our collection here.

Deepening our thinking around DEI starts with who and what we are reading, helping us to develop our confidence and our competence, both individually and collectively. Reading the blogs by our community provokes reflection and stimulates conversations to help us all understand the breadth and the depth of issues we need to develop an awareness of. 

Themes explored in the 2020-21 blog collection include: allyship, belonging, careers, coaching, commitment, community, curriculum, culture, governance, HR, identity, ITTE, language, leadership, policy, recruitment, reflection, representation, research, safeguarding, strategy, teaching, wellbeing. 

 

Here are our Top 10 Most-Read #DiverseEd Blogs in the 2020-21 academic year:

  1. How do we deal with racism in the classroom – Hannah Wilson 
  2. How to promote an anti-racist culture in social work – Wayne Reid 
  3. Interactive diversity calendar 2021 – Carly Hind/ Dual Frequency 
  4. How does material deprivation intersect with ethnicity to understand the variations in the achievement among BAME students – Nicole Edwards 
  5. Don’t tuck in your labels – Bennie Kara 
  6. Dear Secretary of State – Hannah Wilson 
  7. Gender is wibbly wobbly and timey wimey and gloriously so – Matthew Savage 
  8. Engaging with diversity – giving pupils a voice – Gaurav Dubay 
  9. Black lives matter, then now always – Wayne Reid 
  10. Breaking the cycle anti-racist plan term 1 – Dwain Brandy 

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to our #DiverseEd date and please do get in touch if you would like us to publish you. You can find out more about how to submit here.

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Supporting Women into a Career in Banking

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Written by DbGO

Written by dbGO, the Deutsche Bank gender inclusion network: db.com/diversity

At Deutsche Bank, we believe that diverse teams perform better. Different perspectives, experiences and backgrounds of our employees support better decision making. Gender plays a key role in this. But many companies still have a long way to go to achieve gender balance. Statistics show that women are underrepresented at senior levels in organisations across all 20 sectors of the economy. 

Deutsche Bank is on a mission to help change this. With a new target of having women in 35% of leadership roles by 2025, the bank wants to attract more female talent into banking to help improve gender balance and close the gender pay gap. ithin Deutsche Bank, dbGO is the gender inclusion network, run entirely by a team of volunteers who come together to support women across the bank. Their mission is to promote gender diversity to build better business and strengthen inclusion at the bank.

dbGO has created a film as part of an outreach initiative for schools targeting 13 to 18 year old female students. In collaboration with Diverse Educators and the bank’s youth engagement programme, Born to Be, the film will be distributed to schools across the UK to help demystify banking and open the eyes of female students to the opportunities available.

Hoping to inspire the future generation, six female Deutsche Bank employees with different personal and educational backgrounds have shared their career stories in the film. They share their journeys from education to their first job, what they wanted to be when they left school and how they ended up in banking – spoiler alert – it wasn’t on anyone’s grand plan! The women, who are at different seniority levels at the bank, tell the audience candidly, what it’s like to be a woman in banking, the mentoring and support they have received and the opportunities available to progress your career. 

The film showcases the different types of roles available inside a bank – including roles that you wouldn’t typically expect. From trading, marketing, technology, legal to risk management, there really is something for everyone, as one participant reveals.

The film can be previewed at a webinar for school teachers with a live Q&A on Monday 5th July – book to join us here or to stay in touch about the campaign here.  Participants will be able to hear more from Deutsche Bank at the session about why they have created the film and why they feel it is important to be shown to female students in particular as they start to make decisions that can affect their future careers.

In October, as part of International Day of the Girl, the film will be streamed to schools across the UK for students to learn more about banking careers and have the chance to ask questions to female Deutsche Bank employees about their careers and career journeys.  

For more information about getting involved with this careers resource please contact: hannah@diverseeducators.co.uk 

For more information follow:

Twitter @dbCitizenship @DeutscheBank

Facebook/DeutscheBank

Facebook/DeutscheBankCareers

Facebook/dbCitizenship

LinkedIn: Deutsche-Bank

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